Standards Database Logo
Home | Browse | Search | Purpose | History | Process | Acknowledgment| Reference

 


 


Topic: Historical sources 

World History

 Standard 5.  Understands the political, social, and cultural consequences of population movements and militarization in Eurasia in the second millennium BCE
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 6.Understands the emergence and militarization of new kingdoms (e.g., what visual and written sources suggest about the impact of chariot warfare on the battlefield; the boundaries of major states in Southwest Asia, Egypt, and the Eastern Mediterranean in the later part of the 2nd millennium BCE and why wars and diplomatic relations among these states may have represented the first era of "internationalism" in world history)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the emergence of new kingdoms in 2nd millennium BCE
     2.Understands the militarization of new kingdoms in 2nd millennium BCE
     3.Understands what visual and written sources suggest about the impact of chariot warfare on the battlefield
     4.Knows the boundaries of major states in Southwest Asia in the later part of the 2nd millennium BCE
     5.Knows the boundaries of major states in Egypt in the later part of the 2nd millennium BCE
     6.Knows the boundaries of major states in the Eastern Mediterranean in the later part of the 2nd millennium BCE
     7.Understands why wars and diplomatic relations among major states in Southwest Asia, Egypt, and the Eastern Mediterranean may have represented the first era of "internationalism" in world history
   Benchmark 8.Understands the reliability of epics as historic sources and the aspects of these works historians have determined actually reflect contemporary or later culture (e.g., the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Mahabarata, and the Ramayana)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the reliability of epics as historic sources
     2.Knows the aspects of epic works (e.g., the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Mahabarata, and the Ramayana)that historians have determined actually reflect contemporary or later culture
 Standard 12.  Understands the Imperial crises and their aftermath in various regions from 300 to 700 CE
  Level III (Grade 7-8)
   Benchmark 1.Understands political events that may have contributed to the decline of the Roman and Han Empires (e.g., the consequences of nomadic military movements in China and the western part of the Roman Empire; the nomadic invasions of the Roman Empire as described in the accounts of Orosius, Ammianus Marcellinus, Priscus, and secondary sources; significant battles, internal divisions, political changes, and invasions between the 3rd and 7th centuries CE that led to the fall of the Roman and Han Empires; the relative strengths and weaknesses of the Roman, Byzantine, and Han Empires)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands political events that may have contributed to the decline of the Roman Empire
     2.Understands political events that may have contributed to the decline of the Han Empire
     3.Understands the consequences of nomadic military movements in China and the western part of the Roman Empire
     4.Understands the nomadic invasions of the Roman Empire as described in the accounts of Orosius, Ammianus Marcellinus, Priscus, and secondary sources
     5.Knows significant battles, internal divisions, political changes, and invasions between the 3rd and 7th centuries CE that led to the fall of the Roman Empire
     6.Knows significant battles, internal divisions, political changes, and invasions between the 3rd and 7th centuries CE that led to the fall of the Han Empire
     7.Understands the relative strengths and weaknesses of the Roman, Byzantine, and Han Empires
 Standard 20.  Understands the redefinition of European society and culture from 1000 to 1300 CE
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 7.Understands the social elements of feudalism (e.g., the daily life of serfs, knights, and lords as feudalism developed late in the 1st millennium CE; how their lives and duties were interrelated, and what diverse sources illustrate about this life and this time)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands elements of the daily life of serfs as feudalism developed late in the 1st millennium CE
     2.Understands elements of the daily life of knights as feudalism developed late in the 1st millennium CE
     3.Understands elements of the daily life of lords as feudalism developed late in the 1st millennium CE
     4.Understands how the lives and duties of serfs, knights, and lords were interrelated
     5.Knows what diverse sources illustrate about daily life under feudalism in Europe
 Standard 21.  Understands the rise of the Mongol Empire and its consequences for Eurasian peoples from 1200 to 1350
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 5.Understands the usefulness of foreign sources in recording the history in areas of Mongol domination (e.g., the travels of Marco Polo, John of Plano Carpini, and Ibn Battuta)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the usefulness of the travels of Marco Polo in recording the history in the areas of Mongol domination
     2.Understands the usefulness of the travels of John of Plano Carpini in recording the history in the areas of Mongol domination
     3.Understands the usefulness of the travels of Ibn Battuta in recording the history in the areas of Mongol domination
 Standard 23.  Understands patterns of crisis and recovery in Afro-Eurasia between 1300 and 1450
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 5.Understands perceptions of the Black Death from diverse, contemporaneous sources (e.g., from Boccaccio in Europe and Ibn Battuta in Egypt and Syria)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands perceptions of the Black Death from Boccaccio in Europe
     2.Understands perceptions of the Black Death from Ibn Battuta in Egypt and Syria)
 Standard 24.  Understands the expansion of states and civilizations in the Americas between 1000 and 1500
  Level II (Grade 5-6)
   Benchmark 3.Understands what archaeological, artistic, and written sources can illustrate about pre-European life in the Americas
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands what archaeological evidence can illustrate about pre European life in the Americas
     2.Understands what artistic sources can illustrate about pre European life in the Americas
     3.Understands what written sources can illustrate about pre European life in the Americas
 Standard 35.  Understands patterns of nationalism, state-building, and social reform in Europe and the Americas from 1830 to 1914
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 12.Understands sources that illustrate social conditions and cultural identity in 19th-century Europe (e.g., how primary sources such as diaries reflect the life experiences of middle and working class men and women in 19th-century Europe; the characteristics of popular, diverse 19th-century art styles, such as Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism; how Europeans shaped their identity through their view of "other" peoples and cultures)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands sources that illustrate social conditions in 19th century Europe
     2.Understands sources that illustrate cultural identity in 19th century Europe
     3.Understands how primary sources such as diaries reflect the life experiences of middle and working class men and women in 19th century Europe
     4.Knows the characteristics of popular, diverse 19th century art styles, such as Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism
     5.Understands how Europeans shaped their identity through their view of "other" peoples and cultures
 Standard 39.  Understands the causes and global consequences of World War I
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 1.Understands arguments and theories regarding the causes of World War I (e.g., the role of social and class conflict leading to World War I; how primary and secondary sources illustrate the arguments presented by leaders on the eve of the Great War; why and how political leaders in European nations felt aggressive foreign policy, and the advocation of war, would help subdue domestic discontent and disorder; the arguments for and against war used by diverse political groups and figures in European countries)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands arguments regarding the causes of World War I
     2.Understands theories regarding the causes of World War I
     3.Understands the role of social conflict leading to World War I
     4.Understands the role of class conflict leading to World War I
     5.Understands how primary sources illustrate the arguments presented by leaders on the eve of the Great War
     6.Understands how secondary sources illustrate the arguments presented by leaders on the eve of the Great War
     7.Understands how and why political leaders in European nations felt aggressive foreign policy would help subdue domestic discontent and disorder
     8.Understands how and why political leaders in European nations felt the advocation of war would help subdue domestic discontent and disorder
     9.Understands the arguments for war used by diverse political groups and figures in European countries
     10.Understands the arguments against war used by diverse political groups and figures in European countries
   Benchmark 8.Understands the human cost and social impact of World War I (e.g., what sources, such as letters and books, illustrate about the mental and physical costs of the war to soldiers around the world; how the casualty figures for World War I compare to other wars, and reasons for the high casualty rate; the changes in women's roles during the Great War)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the human cost of World War I
     2.Understands the social impact of World War I
     3.Understands what sources illustrate about the mental costs of the war around the world
     4.Knows about letters that illustrate the cost of the war to soldiers around the world
     5.Knows about books that illustrate the cost of the war to soldiers around the world
     6.Understands how the casualty figures for World War I compare to other wars
     7.Understands the reasons for the high casualty rate

Historical Understanding

 Standard 1.  Understands and knows how to analyze chronological relationships and patterns
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   Benchmark 1.Knows how to diagram the temporal structure of events in autobiographies, biographies, literary narratives, and historical narratives, and understands the differences between them
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows how to diagram the temporal structure of events in autobiographies
     2.Knows how to diagram the temporal structure of events in biographies
     3.Knows how to diagram the temporal structure of events in literary narratives
     4.Knows how to diagram the temporal structure of events in historical narratives
     5.Understands the differences between the temporal structure of events in autobiographies, biographies, literary narratives, and historical narratives
 Standard 2.  Understands the historical perspective
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   Benchmark 6.Knows different types of primary and secondary sources and the motives, interests, and bias expressed in them (e.g., eyewitness accounts, letters, diaries, artifacts, photos; magazine articles, newspaper accounts, hearsay)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows different types of primary sources
     2.Knows different types of secondary sources
     3.Understands the motives expressed in primary sources
     4.Understands the motives expressed in secondary sources
     5.Understands the interests expressed in primary sources
     6.Understands the interests expressed in secondary sources
     7.Understands the biases expressed in primary sources
     8.Understands the biases expressed in secondary sources
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 14.Uses historical maps to understand the relationship between historical events and geography
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows how to read a historical map