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Topic: Early hominid development 

World History

 Standard 1.  Understands the biological and cultural processes that shaped the earliest human communities
  Level II (Grade 5-6)
   Benchmark 1.Understands scientific evidence regarding early hominid evolution in Africa (e.g., daily life of individuals and communities in early hunter-gatherer populations; major anthropological discoveries, their locations, and their discoverers)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the daily life of individuals and communities in early hunter-gatherer populations
     2.Understands major anthropological discoveries in Africa
     3.Knows the locations of major anthropological discoveries in Africa
     4.Knows the individuals who have made major anthropological discoveries in Africa
  Level III (Grade 7-8)
   Benchmark 1.Understands early hominid development and scientific methods used to determine the dates and evolution of different human communities (e.g., methods employed by archaeologists, geologists, and anthropologists to study hominid evolution; the approximate chronology, sequence, and territorial range of early hominid evolution in Africa from the Australopithecines to Homo erectus)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows a variety of scientific methods used by archaeologists, geologists, and anthropologists to determine the dates of early human communities
     2.Knows a variety of scientific methods used by archaeologists, geologists, and anthropologists to study the evolution of early human communities
     3.Knows the approximate chronology and sequence of early hominid evolution in Africa from the Australopithecines to Homo erectus
     4.Knows the territorial range of early hominid evolution in Africa from the Australopithecines to Homo erectus
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 1.Understands methods by which early human communities are studied and what these studies reveal (e.g., the way in which newly discovered sites and investigative techniques used to examine them affect the study and understanding of human evolution, how common refuse can be studied to make inferences about earlier communities)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the way in which newly discovered sites and investigative techniques used to examine them affect the study and understanding of human evolution
     2.Knows how common refuse can be studied to make inferences about earlier communities
   Benchmark 3.Understands physical, social, and cultural characteristics of different human communities (e.g., the possible types of early hominid communities; characteristics of skeletal remains of nonhominid, primate, hominid, and Homo sapiens and how to classify them chronologically; major features of flora, fauna, and climate associated with different hominid communities)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows physical characteristics of different early human communities
     2.Knows social characteristics of different early human communities
     3.Knows cultural characteristics of different early human communities
     4.Knows the possible types of early hominid communities
     5.Knows characteristics of skeletal remains of nonhominid, primate, hominid, and Homo sapiens and how to classify them chronologically
     6.Knows major features of flora, fauna, and climate associated with different hominid communities
   Benchmark 4.Understands environmental, biological, and cultural influences on early human communities (e.g., how language helped early humans hunt, establish roles, rules, and structure within communities; the proposition that Mesolithic peoples were the first to take advantage of a changing climate; biological and cultural relationships between Neanderthal and Homo sapiens sapiens)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands environmental influences on early human communities
     2.Understands biological influences on early human communities
     3.Understands cultural influences on early human communities
     4.Understands how language helped early humans hunt, establish roles, rules, and structure within communities
     5.Knows the proposition that Mesolithic peoples were the first to take advantage of a changing climate
     6.Understands the biological and cultural relationships between Neanderthal and Homo sapiens sapiens