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Topic: Historic documents, treaties, and agreements 

World History

 Standard 40.  Understands the search for peace and stability throughout the world in the 1920s and 1930s
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 7.Understands how the treaties ending World War I and the League of Nations addressed different groups of people (e.g., how treaties ending World War I accorded with Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points and the processes by which the treaties were established, the varied reactions of the Chinese to the provisions of the Versailles Peace Treaty, the goals and failures of the "racial equality clause" in the preamble to the Covenant of the League of Nations)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the groups of people addressed in the treaties ending World War I
     2.Understands the groups of people addressed in the League of Nations
     3.Understands how treaties ending World War I accorded with Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points
     4.Understands the process by which the treaties ending Word War I were established
     5.Understands the varied reactions of the Chinese to the provisions of the Versailles Peace Treaty
     6.Understands the goals of the "racial equality clause" in the preamble to the Covenant of the League of Nations

Civics

 Standard 8.  Understands the central ideas of American constitutional government and how this form of government has shaped the character of American society
  Level II (Grade 3-5)
   Benchmark 3.Knows how fundamental values and principles of American democracy are expressed in documents such as the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights, as well as in American songs, stories, and speeches
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows how the fundamental values of American democracy are expressed in a variety of documents
     2.Knows how the fundamental principles of American democracy are expressed in a variety of documents
     3.Knows how the fundamental values and principles of American democracy are expressed in the Declaration of Independence
     4.Knows how the fundamental values and principles of American democracy are expressed in the Preamble to the United States Constitution
     5.Knows how the fundamental values and principles of American democracy are expressed in the Bill of Rights
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   Benchmark 1.Knows the essential ideas of American constitutional government that are expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other writings (e.g., the Constitution is a higher law that authorizes a government of limited powers; the Preamble to the Constitution states the purposes of government such as to form a more perfect union, establish justice, provide for the common defense, and promote the general welfare)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows the essential ideas of American constitutional government that are expressed in the Declaration of Independence
     2.Knows the essential ideas of American constitutional government that are expressed in the Constitution
     3.Knows the essential ideas of American constitutional government that are expressed in a variety of writings
     4.Knows that the Constitution is a higher law that authorizes a government of limited powers
     5.Knows that the Preamble to the Constitution states the purposes of government
     6.Knows that the Preamble to the Constitution states one purpose of the government is to form a more perfect union
     7.Knows that the Preamble to the Constitution states one purpose of government is to establish justice
     8.Knows that the Preamble to the Constitution states one purpose of government is to provide for the common defense
     9.Knows that the Preamble to the Constitution states one purpose of government is to promote the general welfare of society
   Benchmark 2.Knows how certain provisions of the United States Constitution give government the necessary power to fulfill its purposes (e.g., delegated or enumerated powers as stated in Articles I, II, and III; the general welfare provision as stated in Article I, Section 8; the necessary and proper clause as stated in Article I, Section 8, Clause 18)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the provision of delegated or enumerated powers as stated in Articles I, II, and III
     2.Understands the general welfare provision as stated in Article I, Section 8
     3.Understands the necessary and proper clause as stated in Article I, Section 8, Clause 18
   Benchmark 3.Understands how the United States Constitution serves to limit the powers of government (e.g., separation and sharing of powers, checks and balances, Bill of Rights)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands that United States Constitution serves to limit the powers of government with the separation and sharing of powers
     2.Understands that United States Constitution serves to limit the powers of government with checks and balances
     3.Understands that United States Constitution serves to limit the powers of government with the Bill of Rights
   Benchmark 4.Understands how specific provisions of the United States Constitution (including the Bill of Rights) limit the powers of government in order to protect the rights of individuals (e.g., habeas corpus; trial by jury; ex post facto; freedom of religion, speech, press, and assembly; equal protection of the law; due process of law; right to counsel)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as habeas corpus, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     2.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as trial by jury, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     3.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as ex post facto, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     4.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as freedom of religion, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     5.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as freedom of speech, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     6.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as freedom of the press, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     7.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as freedom of assembly, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     8.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as equal protection of the law, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     9.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as due process of law, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
     10.Understands that specific provisions of the United States Constitution, such as right to counsel, limits the power of the government to protect the rights of individuals
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 1.Knows major historical events that led to the creation of limited government in the United States (e.g., Magna Carta (1215), common law, and the Bill of Rights (1689) in England; colonial experience, Declaration of Independence (1776), Articles of Confederation (1781), state constitutions and charters, United States Constitution (1787), Bill of Rights (1791) in the United States)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows that the Magna Carta (1215) was a historical event that led to the creation of limited government in the United states
     3.Knows that the English Bill of Rights (1689) was a historical event that led to the creation of limited government in the United States
     5.Knows that the Declaration of Independence (1776) was a historical event that led to the creation of limited government in the United States
     6.Knows that the Articles of Confederation (1781) was a historical event that led to the creation of limited government in the United States
     7.Knows that the creation of state constitutions and charters was a historical event that led to the creation of limited government in the United States
     8.Knows that the United States Constitution (1787) was a historical event that led to the creation of limited government in the United States
     9.Knows that the Bill of Rights (1791) was a historical event that led to the creation of limited government in the United States
 Standard 9.  Understands the importance of Americans sharing and supporting certain values, beliefs, and principles of American constitutional democracy
  Level II (Grade 3-5)
   Benchmark 3.Knows how specific documents in American history set forth shared values, principles, and beliefs (e.g., Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution and Bill of Rights, Pledge of Allegiance)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows how the Declaration of Independence sets forth shared values, principles, and beliefs
     2.Knows how the United States Constitution sets forth shared values, principles, and beliefs
     3.Knows how the Bill of Rights sets forth shared values, principles, and beliefs
     4.Knows how the Pledge of Allegiance sets forth shared values, principles, and beliefs
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   Benchmark 1.Identifies fundamental values and principles that are expressed in basic documents (e.g., Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution), significant political speeches and writings (e.g., The Federalist, King's "I Have a Dream" speech), and individual and group actions that embody fundamental values and principles (e.g., suffrage and civil rights movements)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows the fundamental values and principles that are expressed in basic documents
     4.Knows the fundamental values and principles that are expressed in the Declaration of Independence
     5.Knows the fundamental values and principles that are expressed in the United States Constitution
 Standard 11.  Understands the role of diversity in American life and the importance of shared values, political beliefs, and civic beliefs in an increasingly diverse American society
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   Benchmark 6.Knows basic values and principles that Americans share (e.g., as set forth in documents such as the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, the Gettysburg Address)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows the basic values that Americans share as set forth in historic documents
     2.Knows the basic principles that Americans share as set forth in historic documents
     3.Knows basic values and principles that Americans share as set forth in the Declaration of Independence
     4.Knows basic values and principles that Americans share as set forth in the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights
     5.Knows basic values and principles that Americans share as set forth in the Gettysburg Address
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 6.Knows how shared ideas and values of American political culture are reflected in various sources and documents (e.g., the Bill of Rights, The Federalist and Anti-federalist writings, Woodrow Wilson's "Fourteen Points," Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from the Birmingham Jail," landmark decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows how the shared ideas of American political culture are reflected in various sources and documents
     2.Knows how the shared values of American political culture are reflected in various sources and documents
     3.Knows how shared ideas and values of American political culture are reflected in the Bill of Rights
     4.Knows how shared ideas and values of American political culture are reflected in "The Federalist" and Anti federalist writings
     5.Knows how shared ideas and values of American political culture are reflected in Woodrow Wilson’s "Fourteen Points"
     6.Knows how shared ideas and values of American political culture are reflected in Martin Luther King, Jr.’s "Letter from the Birmingham Jail"
     7.Knows how shared ideas and values of American political culture are reflected in landmark decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States
 Standard 15.  Understands how the United States Constitution grants and distributes power and responsibilities to national and state government and how it seeks to prevent the abuse of power
  Level II (Grade 3-5)
   Benchmark 1.Understands that the Constitution is a written document which states that the fundamental purposes of American government are to protect individual rights and promote the common good
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows that the Constitution is a written document
     2.Knows the Constitution states that one of the fundamental purposes of American government is to protect individual rights
     3.Knows the Constitution states that one of the fundamental purposes of American government is to promote the common good
   Benchmark 2.Knows that the Constitution describes how the government is organized, defines and limits the powers of government, and is the highest law in the land
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows that the Constitution describes how the government is organized
     2.Knows that the Constitution defines and limits the powers of government
     3.Knows that the Constitution is the highest law in the land
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   Benchmark 1.Understands how the first three words of the Preamble to the Constitution, "We the People...," embodies the principle of the people as the ultimate source of sovereignty
    Knowledge/skill statements
     2.Understands how the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution embodies the principles of American democracy
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 1.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by aggregating power at the national, state, and local levels to allow government to be responsive; dispersing power among different levels of government to protect individual rights, promote the common good, and encourage citizen participation; and using a system of checks and balances (e.g., separated institutions with shared powers, provisions for veto and impeachment, federalism, judicial review, the Bill of Rights)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands how the overall design of the Constitution prevents the abuse of power
     2.Understands how the specific features of the Constitution prevents the abuse of power
     3.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by aggregating power at the national, state, and local levels to allow government to be responsive
     4.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by dispersing power among different levels of government to protect individual rights
     5.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by dispersing power among different levels of government to promote the common good
     6.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by dispersing power among different levels of government to encourage citizen participation
     7.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by using a system of checks and balances
     8.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by using a system of checks and balances, such as separating institutions with shared powers
     9.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by using a system of checks and balances, such as making provisions for veto and impeachment
     10.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by using a system of checks and balances, such as a setting up a system of federalism
     11.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by using a system of checks and balances, such as setting up judicial review
     12.Understands how the overall design and specific features of the Constitution prevent the abuse of power by using a system of checks and balances, such as providing the Bill of Rights
 Standard 16.  Understands the major responsibilities of the national government for domestic and foreign policy, and understands how government is financed through taxation
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   Benchmark 2.Understands how and why foreign policies affect the lives of American citizens, and knows historical and contemporary examples of important foreign policies (e.g., Monroe Doctrine, Marshall Plan, immigration acts, arms control, promoting democracy and human rights throughout the world)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     5.Understands the Monroe Doctrine
     6.Understands the Marshall Plan
 Standard 17.  Understands issues concerning the relationship between state and local governments and the national government and issues pertaining to representation at all three levels of government
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 1.Knows the limits the United States Constitution places on the powers of the states (e.g., prohibitions against impairing interstate commerce, restrictions imposed by the Fourteenth Amendment and the Bill of Rights through the process of incorporation) and the limits the Constitution places on the powers of the national government over state governments (e.g., the national government cannot abolish a state, the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution reserves certain powers to the states)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows the limits the United States Constitution places on the powers of the states
     2.Knows the limits the Constitution places on the powers of the national government over state governments
     3.Knows that the U.S. Constitution prohibits states against impairing interstate commerce
     4.Knows the restrictions imposed by the Fourteenth Amendment and the Bill of Rights through the process of incorporation
     5.Knows that the national government cannot abolish a state by rule of the U.S. Constitution
     6.Knows that the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution reserves certain powers to the states
 Standard 22.  Understands how the world is organized politically into nation-states, how nation-states interact with one another, and issues surrounding U.S. foreign policy
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   Benchmark 4.Knows the most important powers the United States Constitution gives to the Congress, president, and federal judiciary in foreign affairs (e.g., Congress can declare war, raise and support armies, provide a navy [Article I, Section 8] and the Senate can approve treaties; the president is Commander in Chief and can make treaties and appoint ambassadors [Article II]; the federal judiciary can decide cases affecting treaties and ambassadors, and those involving treason [Article III])
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows the most important powers that the United States Constitution grants to Congress in foreign affairs
     2.Knows the most important powers the United States Constitution gives to the president in foreign affairs
     3.Knows the most important powers the United States Constitution gives to the federal judiciary in foreign affairs
     4.Knows that the United States Constitution gives Congress the power to declare war [Article I, Section 8]
     5.Knows that the United States Constitution gives Congress the power to raise and support armies [Article I, Section 8]
     6.Knows that the United States Constitution gives Congress the power to provide a navy [Article I, Section 8]
     7.Knows that the United States Constitution gives the Senate the power to approve treaties
     8.Knows that the United States Congress makes the president the Commander in Chief [Article II]
     9.Knows that the United States Constitution gives the president the power to make treaties and appoint ambassadors [Article II]
     10.Knows that the United States Constitution gives the federal judiciary the power to decide cases affecting treaties and ambassadors [Article II]
     11.Knows that the United States Constitution gives the federal judiciary the power to decide cases involving treason [Article III]

Grades K-4 History

 Standard 4.  Understands how democratic values came to be, and how they have been exemplified by people, events, and symbols
  Level II (Grade 3-4)
   Benchmark 1.Understands the basic ideas set forth in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, and the figures responsible for these documents
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the basic ideas set forth in the Declaration of Independence
     2.Understands the basic ideas set forth in the U.S. Constitution
     3.Knows the authors of the Declaration of Independence
     4.Knows the authors of the U.S. Constitution
   Benchmark 9.Knows the history of events and the historic figures responsible for such historical documents as the Mayflower Compact, the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Emancipation Proclamation
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows the history of the events that led to the Mayflower Compact
     2.Knows the historic figures responsible for the Mayflower Compact
     3.Knows the history of the events that led to the Declaration of Independence
     4.Knows the historic figures responsible for the Declaration of Independence
     5.Knows the history of the events that led to the U.S. Constitution
     6.Knows the historic figures responsible for the U.S. Constitution
     7.Knows the history of the events that led to the Bill of Rights
     8.Knows the historic figures responsible for the Bill of Rights
     9.Knows the history of the events that led to the Emancipation Proclamation
     10.Knows the historic figures responsible for the Emancipation Proclamation

United States History

 Standard 6.  Understands the causes of the American Revolution, the ideas and interests involved in shaping the revolutionary movement, and reasons for the American victory
  Level III (Grade 7-8)
   Benchmark 2.Understands contradictions between the Declaration of Independence and the institution of chattel slavery
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the basic principles of the Declaration of Independence
     3.Understands how the Declaration of Independence and the institution of chattel slavery are contradictory
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 3.Understands differences and similarities between the Declaration of Independence and other documents on government (e.g., the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, John Locke’s Two Treatises on Government)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the differences between the Declaration of Independence and other documents on government
     2.Understands the similarities between the Declaration of Independence and other documents on government
     3.Understands the differences between the Declaration of Independence and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen
     4.Understands the similarities between the Declaration of Independence and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen
     5.Understands the differences between the Declaration of Independence and John Locke’s Two Treatises on Government
     6.Understands the similarities between the Declaration of Independence and John Locke’s Two Treatises on Government
   Benchmark 9.Understands the military and diplomatic factors that helped produce the Treaty of Paris
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the military factors that helped produce the Treaty of Paris
     2.Understands the diplomatic factors that helped produce the Treaty of Paris
 Standard 8.  Understands the institutions and practices of government created during the Revolution and how these elements were revised between 1787 and 1815 to create the foundation of the American political system based on the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 1.Understands influences on the ideas established by the Constitution (e.g., the ideas behind the distribution of powers and the system of checks and balances; the influence of 18th-century republican ideals and the economic and political interests of different regions on the compromises reached in the Constitutional Convention)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the ideas behind the distribution of powers in the Constitution
     2.Understands the ideas behind the system of checks and balances in the Constitution
     3.Understands the influence of 18th-century republican ideals on the compromises reached in the Constitutional Convention
     4.Understands the influence of the economic interests of different regions on the compromises reached in the Constitutional Convention
     5.Understands the influence of the political interests of different regions on the compromises reached in the Constitutional Convention
 Standard 11.  Understands the extension, restriction, and reorganization of political democracy after 1800
  Level II (Grade 5-6)
   Benchmark 3.Understands divisive issues prior to the Civil War (e.g., the Missouri Compromise and its role in determining slave and non-slave land areas, the issues that divided the North and the South)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Knows about the Missouri Compromise
     2.Understands the role of the Missouri compromise in determining slave and non-slave land areas
 Standard 15.  Understands how various reconstruction plans succeeded or failed
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 2.Understands the 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution (e.g., how citizenship was included, why the clauses of "equal protection of the laws" and "due process" were included, why women were excluded in the 15th amendment)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the 14th amendment to the Constitution
     2.Understands the 15th amendment to the Constitution
     3.Understands how citizenship was included in the 14th amendment
     4.Understands why the clause "equal protection of the laws" was included in the 14th amendment
     5.Understands why the clause "due process" was included in the 14th amendment
     6.Understands why women were excluded in the 15th amendment
   Benchmark 3.Understands events leading to the formation of the Compromise of 1877 (e.g., the role of violence and tactics of the "redeemers" in bringing about the Compromise, the consequences in the South)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands the role of violence in bringing about the Compromise of 1877
     2.Understands the tactics of the "redeemers" in bringing about the Compromise of 1877
     3.Understands the consequences of the Compromise of 1877 in the South
 Standard 21.  Understands the changing role of the United States in world affairs through World War I
  Level II (Grade 5-6)
   Benchmark 3.Understands U.S. involvement in World War I (e.g., how the American Expeditionary Force contributed to the Allied victory, Wilson’s Fourteen Points, the negotiation of the Versailles Treaty, the national debate over treaty ratification and the League of Nations)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     2.Knows about Wilson’s Fourteen Points
     3.Understands the negotiation of the Versailles Treaty
     4.Understands the national debate over treaty ratification
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   Benchmark 4.Understands influences on the outcome of World War I (e.g., how point six of the Fourteen Points dealt specifically with Russia, the effectiveness of the Versailles Treaty)
    Knowledge/skill statements
     1.Understands how point six of the Fourteen Points dealt specifically with Russia
     2.Understands the effectiveness of the Versailles Treaty