Standards Database Logo
Home | Browse | Search | Purpose | History | Process | Acknowledgment| Reference

 


 


Civics

Standard 5.Understands the major characteristics of systems of shared powers and of parliamentary systems
  Level Pre-K (Grade Pre-K)
   1. Not appropriate for this level
  Level I (Grade K-2)
   1. Not appropriate for this level
  Level II (Grade 3-5)
   1. Not appropriate for this level
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   1. Understands the primary responsibilities of each branch of government in a system of shared powers (e.g., legislative, executive, judicial) and ways in which each branch shares the powers and functions of the other branches
   2. Understands characteristics of systems of shared powers (e.g., in the United States the president and members of the president’s Cabinet cannot be members of Congress)
   3. Understands characteristics of parliamentary systems (e.g., in the United Kingdom a legislature called Parliament assumes authority, the political party or parties that can form a majority in Parliament select the prime minister, and the prime minister selects cabinet members; the prime minister and members of the cabinet must all be members of Parliament)
   4. Understands that in parliamentary systems the prime minister and cabinet direct the administration of the government, but the prime minister and cabinet may be replaced by Parliament if a majority votes "no confidence" in the government
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   1. Understands the major characteristics of systems of shared powers (e.g., in the United States and Brazil the executive, legislative, and judicial branches each have primary responsibility for certain functions and share some of the powers and functions of the other branches)
   2. Understands the major characteristics of parliamentary systems (e.g., in the United Kingdom and Israel authority is held by Parliament and the party or parties that form the majority select the prime minister)
   3. Understands the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various ways power is distributed, shared, and limited in systems of shared powers and parliamentary systems (e.g., in terms of effectiveness, prevention of the abuse of power, responsiveness to popular will, stability, ability to serve the purposes of constitutional government)