Standards Database Logo
Home | Browse | Search | Purpose | History | Process | Acknowledgment| Reference

 


 


Civics

Standard 17.Understands issues concerning the relationship between state and local governments and the national government and issues pertaining to representation at all three levels of government
  Level Pre-K (Grade Pre-K)
   1. Not appropriate for this level
  Level I (Grade K-2)
   1. Not appropriate for this level
  Level II (Grade 3-5)
   1. Knows how to distinguish among national, state, and local governments
   2. Knows the major responsibilities of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of his/her state government
   3. Knows major services provided by national, state, and local governments (e.g., state services such as education and health services and local services such as transportation, education, recreation, public safety, public utilities), and knows how these services are paid for (e.g., taxes, fees, licenses)
   4. Knows how state and local government officials are chosen (i.e., by election or appointment)
   5. Knows how people can participate in their state and local government (e.g., being informed, taking part in discussing issues, voting, volunteering their time), and understands why it is important that people participate in their state and local government (e.g., improve the quality of life in their community, gain personal satisfaction, prevent officials from abusing power)
   6. Knows the names of his/her legislators at the state and national levels (e.g., representatives and senators in his/her state legislature and in Congress) and the names of his/her representatives in the executive branches of government at the national, state, and local levels (e.g., mayor, governor, president)
   7. Knows how to contact his/her representatives and which levels of government he/she should contact to express his/her opinions or get help on a specific problem (e.g., the environment, crime, stray or wild animals)
  Level III (Grade 6-8)
   1. Understands that his/her state has a constitution because the United States is a federal system
   2. Knows the major purposes of his/her state constitution, the process by which citizens can change their state constitution, and the basic similarities and differences between his/her state constitution and the United States Constitution
   3. Understands why the United States Constitution cannot be violated by state constitutions and state governments
   4. Understands the process by which citizens can change their state constitution and cite examples of changes
   5. Knows the major responsibilities of his/her state and local governments (e.g., education, welfare, streets and roads, parks, recreation, law enforcement), and understands the organization of his/her state and local governments (e.g., legislative, executive, and judicial functions at state and local levels)
   6. Knows major sources of revenue for state and local governments (e.g., property, sales, and income taxes; fees and licenses; taxes on corporations and businesses; borrowing)
   7. Understands how he/she can contact his/her representatives and why it is important to do so, and knows which level of government he/she should contact to express his/her opinions or to get help on a specific problem (e.g., opinions about a curfew for juveniles, an increase in state sales tax, aid to another country; problems with street lights, driver’s license, federal income taxes)
  Level IV (Grade 9-12)
   1. Knows the limits the United States Constitution places on the powers of the states (e.g., prohibitions against impairing interstate commerce, restrictions imposed by the Fourteenth Amendment and the Bill of Rights through the process of incorporation) and the limits the Constitution places on the powers of the national government over state governments (e.g., the national government cannot abolish a state, the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution reserves certain powers to the states)
   2. Understands that the two kinds of power most commonly associated with state governments are reserved powers, which are powers not delegated to the national government or prohibited to states by the United States Constitution (e.g., legislation regarding public safety, marriage, and divorce; education; the conduct of elections; chartering regional and local governments; licensing drivers, businesses, and professions) and concurrent powers, which are powers jointly held with the national government (e.g., legislating taxation, regulating trade and industry, borrowing money, maintaining courts, protecting the environment)
   3. Understands criteria for evaluating how the relationship between state and local governments and the national government has changed over time
   4. Understands criteria for evaluating the argument that state and local governments provide significant opportunities for experimentation and innovation
   5. Understands criteria for evaluating the relationship between his/her state and local governments
   6. Understands how the policies of state and local governments provide citizens with ways to monitor and influence the actions of members of government and hold them responsible for their actions (e.g., requirements of fair and public notice of meetings, meetings of government agencies must be open to the public, public trials, provision of opportunities for citizens to be heard)