Standards Database Logo
Home | Browse | Search | Purpose | History | Process | Acknowledgment| Reference

 


 

McREL Standards Activity


The Ties That Bind


Purpose:As a result of this activity, students will be able to recognize similarities and differences in social groups to which they belong.
Related Standard & Benchmarks:
Behavioral Studies
 Standard 2.Understands various meanings of social group, general implications of group membership, and different ways that groups function
   Level I [Grade K-2]
   Benchmark 1. Knows that people belong to some groups because they are born into them and to some groups because they join them
Behavioral Studies
 Standard 2.Understands various meanings of social group, general implications of group membership, and different ways that groups function
   Level I [Grade K-2]
   Benchmark 2. Knows unique features of different groups to which she or he belongs (e.g., family, team, class), and also features of these groups that overlap with other groups
Language Arts
 Standard 8.Uses listening and speaking strategies for different purposes
   Level I [Grade K-2]
   Benchmark 1. Makes contributions in class and group discussions (e.g., reports on ideas and personal knowledge about a topic, initiates conversations, connects ideas and experiences with those of others)
Student Product:A chart comparing different group features
Material & Resources:Students may make their own charts using their pencils and rulers or an empty chart may be distributed for students to fill in.
Teacher's Note:No supplementary notes for this activity.
Activity
In order to understand how social groups are similar and different, ask students to think of various groups to which they belong: family, class, church, sports team, activities, etc. Have students choose three of these groups and tell them that they will construct a chart comparing these groups. Ask students to label the first column as “GROUPS” and to list the three groups that they have chosen in this column. Subsequent columns should be labeled with different group features such as “BORN OR JOIN?” “SIZE” “DRESS” “AGES” “LEADER” and “ACTIVITY.” Under these column headings, students should indicate whether or not they were born into their group, how large or small their group is, whether or not their group requires a costume or uniform, whether or not the group members are the same age, whether or not there is a group leader and who that leader is, and what kind of activity the group engages in. For example, one row might read: Family born 4 no uniform 4, 5, 34, 35 Mom & Dad loving, caring Once the charts have been completed, ask students to compare the similarities that exist between each of the groups by completing the following sentence on a separate sheet of paper: “My _______________ group is similar to my ____________________ group because ___________________. Students will need to write this sentence twice in order to compare all three of the groups listed in their charts. After students have completed their charts and sentences, lead students through a discussion that seeks to answer the question, "How is each group unique or special?" Encourage students to think about different answers to this question and then do discuss how the characteristics of these groups overlap (using their sentences as a starting point). Thinking about the special qualities of different groups can help students to realize how important groups are in our lives!